Indians in Unexpected Places : natives american Intellectual - Université Bordeaux Montaigne

Indians in Unexpected Places : natives american Intellectual

Crédits ECTS : 6

Volume horaire CM : 12

Volume horaire TD : 12

Code ELP : MIA2Y26

Composante : UFR Langues et Civilisations

Période de l'année : Semestre 2

Formes d'enseignement : Non accessible à distance

Description

This master’s seminar will be focused on a very significant and productive, although badly known, period in the history of Native Americans in the United States.
At the turn of the 20th century, after the end of the 19th century so-called Indian Wars (Wounded Knee Massacre in 1890) and before the Indian Reorganization Act (1934), or more specifically during the Progressive Era (roughly between 1890 and 1920), people interested in the future and well-being of Native Americans seem to have produced a concerted effort to finally achieve what they called the “civilization” of the Indian, or his “assimilation,” and solve what was known as “the Indian problem.”
Many non-Native people, known as “Friends of the Indian,” gathered in various organizations, the most influential of which was the Lake Mohonk Conference, which had a considerable impact on Indian policy at that time.
What we will be studying, though, is the intellectual production of Native Americans themselves, some of whom participated in the Lake Mohonk Conference, while others finally decided to create their own exclusively Native American association, the Society of American Indians (SAI, 1911-1923).
These Native American intellectuals addressed issues such as land allotment, the problems of life in the reservations, education (in boarding schools or otherwise), assimilation, and citizenship. These intellectuals—journalists, lawyers, educators, clergymen, etc.—produced, in speech and in writing, a large amount of thoughts and reflections, on behalf of their fellow Native Americans, in order to come to terms with the national society—the United States—of which they had become a part. Doing so, they proposed a new kind of resistance, not against modernity or the European ways, but against the myth of the “Vanishing American.” They invented strategies in order to preserve their identities while finding a place in the colonial U.S. fabric.

Bibliographie

- Gertrude Bonnin, (or Zitkala-Sa)
o Hoxie, Frederick E., ed. Talking Back to Civilization: Indian Voices from the Progressive Era. Boston: Bedford, 2001.
o Peyer, Bernd C., ed. American Indian Nonfiction: An Anthology of Writings, 1760s-1930s. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2007.
- Charles Alexander Eastman
o Eastman, Charles Alexander. Indian Boyhood. 1902. New York: Dover, 1971.
o ---. The Soul of the Indian. 1911. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1980.
o ---. From the Deep Woods to Civilization. 1916. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1977.
- Henry Roe Cloud
o Hoxie, Frederick E., ed. Talking Back to Civilization: Indian Voices from the Progressive Era. Boston: Bedford, 2001.
o Peyer, Bernd C., ed. American Indian Nonfiction: An Anthology of Writings, 1760s-1930s. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2007.
- Laura Cornelius Kellog (or Laura M. Cornelius)
o 1899, 1900, 1901, 1902 Proceedings of the Seventeenth, Eighteenth and Nineteenth, Twentieth Annual Meetings of the Lake Mohonk Conference (on archive.org)
- John M. Oskison
o Oskison, John Milton. Tales of the Old Indian Territory and Essays on the Indian Condition. Ed. Lionel Larré. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2012.
- Arthur C. Parker
o American Indian Nonfiction: An Anthology of Writings, 1760s-1930s. Ed. Bernd C. Peyer. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2007.
o Hoxie, Frederick E., ed. Talking Back to Civilization: Indian Voices from the Progressive Era. Boston: Bedford, 2001. Bibliothèque Henri Guillemin.
- Carlos Montezuma
o Hoxie, Frederick E., ed. Talking Back to Civilization: Indian Voices from the Progressive Era. Boston: Bedford, 2001. Bibliothèque Henri Guillemin.
- Francis La Flesche
o La Flesche, Francis. The Middle Five: Indian Schoolboys of the Omaha Tribe. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1963.
o Hoxie, Frederick E., ed. Talking Back to Civilization: Indian Voices from the Progressive Era. Boston: Bedford, 2001. Bibliothèque Henri Guillemin.

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