Undergraduate Licence: Literatures - Bordeaux Montaigne University

Undergraduate Licence: Literatures



Why study Literatures?

This is a programme of study that prepares students for a range of professions, in the fields of communications, culture, teaching, the book trade, and the written word. The fundamental skills taught by the programme include a strong command of the French language, and a solid general culture: essential skills for all professions. 


This undergraduate Licence in Literatures thus enables students to acquire a range of skills, which are the driving force behind this truly specialised programme of study, but which also extend far beyond the purely academic context. Choosing to study literature means:

  • Learning how to read, via the study of texts from a range of periods and genres, with varied registers and differing complexities, and learning how to analyse text and speech of any kind.
  • Learning compositional skills, ultimately gaining the careful command and good appreciation of the French language, in both its written and oral dimensions, as well as the methods and academic exercises that are specific to the discipline of Literatures (composition; commentary and analysis; summary; abstract; essay).
  • Learning to think, with a strong intellectual training that is of a high quality; that is to say where the focus is on quality and structured knowledge, rather than its quantity. This implies the acquisition of a range of skills and learning, the development of a propensity for critical distance and reflection, and familiarity with the intercultural scope of literary studies (via the study of old languages, the study of a foreign language, and the comparative study of different literatures). 
  • Gaining a general literary culture, thanks to the interaction with other disciplines that may have a point of contact with the literary text: the arts; history; philosophy; art history; foreign literatures and civilisations. Students acquire this level of culture as much through the Literature units (in the strict sense of the term) as they do through the ‘minor’ units, which enable students to build and strengthen skills in other domains beyond that of literatures.
  • Gaining the command of a foreign language. 



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Non-French speakers

For non-French speakers – whether students, employees or researchers – the Department of French as a Foreign Language (DEFLE) offers courses in French as a foreign language for all levels within the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEF).